Mason Bates - The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs

  1. 1) Prologue (Garage)

    3.16

  2. 2) Overture

    1.19

  3. 3) Scene 1 (Launch)

    7.41

  4. 4) Scene 2 (Office)

    3.09

  5. 5) Meditative Interlude

    1.33

  6. 6) Scene 3 (Kobun)

    2.31

  7. 7) Scene 4 (Reed College)

    1.05

  8. 8) Scene 5 (Garage)

    4.04

  9. 9) Scene 6 (Orchard) - "I Could Learn to Like You"

    5.45

  10. 10) Scene 7 (Kobun) - "Take One Step"

    6.23

  11. 11) Scene 8 (Stanford)

    2.14

  12. 12) Scene 9 (Garage)

    4.42

  13. 13) aria - "Something We Play"

    3.44

  1. 1) Scene 10 (Home)

    2.54

  2. 2) Scene 11 (Garage)

    3.52

  3. 3) Interlude: The Rise & Fall of Steve Jobs

    3.03

  4. 4) Scene 12 (Corporate Offices)

    5.54

  5. 5) aria - "Goliath"

    3.04

  6. 6) Scene 12 (coda)

    2.54

  7. 7) Dark Interlude

    1.46

  8. 8) Scenes 13-14-15 (Kobun)

    3.00

  9. 9) Scene 16 - "Humans Are Messy"

    7.41

  10. 10) Lyrical Interlude

    0.51

  11. 11) Scene 17 (Wedding)

    3.38

  12. 12) Scene 18 (Memorial Service)

    3.23

  13. 13) aria - "Look Up, Look Out"- Epilogue

    4.32

CD information

AN OPERA ON ONE OF THE MOST INFLUENTIAL MEN OF MODERN TIMES

In their astounding new opera The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, composer Mason Bates and librettist Mark Campbell explore the spiritual evolution of one of the most influential men of modern times as he creates a revolutionary new world of technological empowerment, then discovers a larger world within himself.

Like Steve Jobs, composer Mason Bates is an innovator whose creativity breaks through boundaries, combining traditional orchestration with electronics in ways that have made him one of the most sought-after and widely programmed composers in the United States. In The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, Bates and Campbell give us an alternative and intimate perspective of a public life, examining the people and experiences that shaped Steve Jobs: his father, his Buddhist practice, his rise and fall as an executive, and finally his marriage to the woman who showed him the power of human connection.