1. 1) Wie schön ist die Prinzessin Salome heute Nacht!

    3.00

  2. 2) Nach mir wird einer kommen

    2.54

  3. 3) Ich will nicht bleiben. Ich kann nicht bleiben

    1.54

  4. 4) Siehe, der Herr ist gekommen

    1.45

  5. 5) Jauchze nicht, du Land Palästina

    4.25

  6. 6) Lasst den Propheten herauskommen

    2.39

  7. 7) Wo ist er, dessen Sündenbecher jetzt voll ist?

    4.41

  8. 8) Er ist schrecklich. Er ist wirklich schrecklich!

    2.17

  9. 9) Wer ist dies Weib, das mich ansieht?

    3.04

  10. 10) Jochanaan! Ich bin verliebt in deinen Leib

    2.31

  11. 11) Dein Leib ist grauenvoll

    2.46

  12. 12) Zurück, Tochter Sodoms! Berühre mich nicht!

    3.08

  13. 13) Niemals, Tochter Babylons, Tochter Sodoms,...Niemals!

    1.21

  14. 14) Wird dir nicht bange, Tochter der Herodias

    3.13

  15. 15) Lass mich deinen Mund küssen, Jochanaan

    1.13

  16. 16) Du bist verflucht

    5.15

  17. 17) Wo ist Salome? Wo ist die Prinzessin?

    4.00

  18. 18) Salome, komm, trink Wein mit mir

    3.07

  19. 19) Sieh, die Zeit ist gekommen

    0.55

  20. 20) Wahrhaftig, Herr, es wäre besser, ihn in unsre Hände zu geben.

    2.52

  21. 21) Siehe, der Tag ist nahe, der Tag des Herrn

    3.45

  22. 22) O über dieses geile Weib, die Tochter Babylons

    2.44

  1. 1) Tanz für mich, Salome

    4.41

  2. 2) Salomes Tanz

    10.10

  3. 3) Ah! Herrlich! Wundervoll, wundervoll

    4.17

  4. 4) Salome, ich beschwöre dich

    3.21

  5. 5) Salome, bedenk, was du tun willst.

    3.12

  6. 6) Gib mir den Kopf des Jochanaan!

    1.59

  7. 7) Es ist kein Laut zu vernehmen

    2.39

  8. 8) Ah! du wolltest mich nicht deinen Mund küssen lassen, Jochanaan

    13.41

  9. 9) Sie ist ein Ungeheuer, deine Tochter

    1.15

  10. 10) Ah! Ich habe deinen Mund geküsst, Jochanaan

    5.00

CD information

Desire. Brutality. Lust. Slyness. Anxiety. What a fascinatingly menacing thematic melange is seething in this Salome. Richard Strauss, the “nervous contrapuntalist,” immediately recognized the potential of Oscar Wilde’s play, and proceeded to add to it a musical meta-plane, which resulted in Salome becoming the scandalous new point of departure for opera in the 20th century.

In its vivid psychological depiction of a corrupt world, Salome is, at the same time, both child of and witness to the dawning of the 20th century – a reflection of a moribund late-bourgeois era, captivated by its own putrefaction. The opera hit the nerve of the times. Strauss poured the Salome catastrophe into a one-act opera lasting a mere 100 minutes. However, these are 100 highly condensed minutes, which demand the listener’s full and uninterrupted attention; first torturing him emotionally and then trickling the venom of sweet, seductive music into his ears and mind; laying his nerves bare, then making him tremble in aroused expectation.

This album, featuring the young, up-and-coming conductor Andrés Orozco-Estrada leading the Frankfurt Radio Symphony (= formerly Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra) is a live recording of a concert given on September 10, 2016 in Frankfurt. The critics were enthusiastic: “The title role was wonderfully relaxed, all the essential components were in general harmonious, and Andrés Orozco-Estrada emphasized the power of the orchestra.” Indeed, Orozco-Estrada surrounded his Salome with outstanding soloists of the German opera repertoire: Wolfgang Koch (Jochanaan), Peter Bronder (Herod), and Michaela Schuster (Herodias). The American soprano Emily Magee made her début as Salome in Berlin in 2011. Since then, she has developed into a true Strauss specialist – and not only in this role. The Frankfurter Rundschau praised her “readily appealing, powerful and untiring soprano voice, which never gets drowned, not even in the orchestral tutti. Her face was a fascinating reflection of the slyness, the caprices, the bitchiness of a pampered princess.”