Tuesday 17 November 2015

All Things Strings : Dvořák and Lalo Cello Concerto Review



"A spectacular, warm recording from the Dutch Pentatone label, Moser’s Dvorak arguably takes top honors with his dazzling virtuosity, free, passionate phrasing and immense energy, resulting in a total command of the music’s emotional power and narrative flow."

 

PENTATONE release of "Dvořák and Lalo Cello Concerto" with Johannes MoserJakub Hrůša, and PKF - Prague Philharmonia received another praising review on All Things Strings! The review was beautifully written to explain how Moser's interpretation is a near miracle and Hrusa's execution on orchestral part is a magnificent glory. Read more of the glowing review below:

 

Now for something entirely different, the only current, and perhaps the first-ever coupling of two diametrically opposed cello concertos. Dvorak’s heavily romantic Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104 is a staple with more than 100 recordings. Edouard Lalo’s flirtatiously Gallic Cello Concerto in D minor, once a staple but now languishing in semi-obscurity, has fewer than 20.

 

[ Check out this album: ]

 

And yet, in performances of incomparable depth and magnitude, Johannes Moser, playing on a 1694 Andrea Guarneri, has forever changed the landscape. Aided and abetted by a marvelous Prague Philharmonia conducted by Jakub Hrusa, and a spectacular, warm recording from the Dutch Pentatone label, Moser’s Dvorak arguably takes top honors with his dazzling virtuosity, free, passionate phrasing and immense energy, resulting in a total command of the music’s emotional power and narrative flow that recalls Pablo Casals’ iconic 1937 recording with the Czech Philharmonic conducted by George Szell—in hi-res sound and with better intonation.

As remarkable as the Dvorak is, what Moser does for the Lalo is a near miracle. It is an electric performance in which he has seemingly examined every nook and cranny of the music, as Hrusa has done with the orchestral part, and emerged with music of such magnificent glory that it puts the Saint-Saens concerto, its only rival among French cello concertos before Dutilleux’s Tout un monde lointain . . . way into the background.

Laurence Vittes