Sunday 4 October 2015

All About Jazz: Orbit - Matt Haimovitz Review



"Orbits" develops as a grand melodic statement that takes advantage of all of Haimovitz's tonal wares. Glass builds his piece around a potent descending figure that is muscular and complete with a whiff of mournful Romanticism to it. Haimovitz displays a firm command of the compositional dynamics that make this piece, and indeed, the entire recording a surprising aural treat.”

Our latest release of "Orbit" Music for Solo Cello (1945 - 2014) from the PENTATONE OXINGALE SERIES received a warm review on All About Jazz. The review describes how Matt Haimovitz demonstrated the variety of harmony satisfactions that comfort listeners. Read more of the review below.

The solo cello repertoire is dominated completely by Johann Sebastian Bach's Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello, BWV 1007-1012. While there exists much more solo cello music than this, the majority of commercial media releases are of Bach's mountain. So, what a about a sampler of solo cello music other than Bach? Matt Haimovitz provides us exactly that with Orbit: Music for Solo Cello (1945— 2014). Rather than one more prim exposition of the Suites or an avant-garde exploration of the instrument's f-holes, Haimovitz surveys the last 50 years of solo cello composition, revealing a varied pallet of tonal pleasures and ruminations that are as much a pleasure to listen to as to contemplate. 

[ Check out the album: ]

Most notably included here is a brand new Philip Glass composition, "Orbit," composed in 2014. It was with no small interest that I wanted to see what Glass had to offer in the wake of a lifetime of spare minimalism. "Orbits" develops as a grand melodic statement that takes advantage of all of Haimovitz's tonal wares. Glass builds his piece around a potent descending figure that is muscular and complete with a whiff of mournful Romanticism to it. Haimovitz displays a firm command of the compositional dynamics that make this piece, and indeed, the entire recording a surprising aural treat.

 

C. Michael Bailey

Photo by: Dave Getzschman